How To Play Piano Chords By Ear (2)

Anybody serious about mastering the art of playing the piano by ear, should endeavor from the very start to learn to play the piano in all twelve different pitched keys, using at least twelve different piano chords in each. Provided the correct procedure is followed, anybody keen about learning to play the piano, will become knowledgeable about constructing piano chords in no time and without any assistance. The secret in learning to play piano chords lies in familiarizing oneself with the layout of the piano keyboard firstly.
The piano is designed to deliver twelve different pitched tones, each of which is named after an alphabetical letter. The 88 notes/keys on the keyboard, are arranged from left to right in a set pattern, ascending in pitch and divided into repeating groups/octaves of thirteen notes/tones. Starting ascending from left to right, the first 7 white notes/keys are known as the 7 natural notes i.e. A-B-C-D-E-F-G-[A] and when sounded ascending individually they give the familiar sound of: DO, RE, ME, FA, SO, LA, TI, [DO]. The 5 black keys in between the 7 naturals, are known as: modifiers. Here’s how to identify their names: Ascending:- the black key to the right of the “A” key, is a semi-tone higher in pitch and is known as the A-sharp note. The black key to the right of the “C” key, is a semi-tone higher in pitch and is known as the “C-sharp” note. The same principle applies to D, F and G. Descending: The black key to the left of the “B” key, is a semi-tone lower in pitch and is known as the B-flat note, meaning that this note/key has 2 names i.e. B-flat and/or A-sharp. Which ever of the two names you wish to call it, is right. The black key to the left of the “A” key, is a semi-tone lower in pitch and is known as the “A-flat” note, meaning that this note/key has 2 names i.e. A-flat and/or G-sharp. Which ever of the two names you wish to call it, is right. The same principle applies to G, E and D. Now do the following: sound the A note/key, counting it as 1, and proceed up by semi-tones to the count of twelve. You have played all twelve different pitched tones on the piano, the said of which is known as the: Chromatic scale. Sounding the 13th note, you’ll notice that it is the same note as that which you started with, A that is, yet on a higher pitch. The range of notes/keys spanning from “A” to “A” (13 semi-tones) is known as an: octave. In order to become conversant with piano chords, it is essential to be thoroughly acquainted with the Chromatic scale.
About the Chromatic scale:
It consists of twelve semi-tones e.g. the Chromatic scale of C: Ascending: C, C-sharp, D, D-sharp, E, F, F-sharp, G, G-sharp, A, A-sharp, B, [C]. Descending: [C, B, B-flat, A, A-flat, G, G-flat, F, E, E-flat, D, D-flat, [C]. Each Chromatic scale follows the same pattern.
Conversant with the above, you are ready to learn how to construct and play piano chords. GOOD LUCK!

About Author
To learn more about this topic, visit the link below and see my downloadable e-book in PDF format, titled: Play Piano Chords by Ear. printablepiano-chords.com
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